Trees with bluejays

Child's drawing of three trees with bluejays

Dear Fenix,

I chose your lovely letter today because of the trees you’ve drawn. I especially love the bluejays tucked into the highest limbs. I have some of those visiting my small backyard from time to time. Their calls sound like a squeaky clothesline to me.

I miss my daily walk in the local woods with my dog. I would write new stories in the morning, and then go for a walk with her to think about what I’d written, and I always came home with some new ideas and a happy dog. Now I’m spending way too much time inside, looking at my computer screen. I can’t wait to get back into the woods. Your drawing gives me hope.

Happy reading,

Jessica

Red bird

Child's drawing of a red bird in the jungle

Dear Danica,

Like you, red is my favorite colour. I especially like red shoes, red wine and red maple leaf flags. I do remember you because you asked a question during my presentation. Pro tip: ask a question at anyone’s presentation and you’ll always be remembered.

I also remember that I told you my favorite bird is a puffin. Is that why you guessed that my favorite colours are black, white and orange? Clever you!

Happy reading,

Jessica

American robin

Child's drawing of an American robin in a tree. Not to scale.

Dear Chris,

Do you mind if I call you Chris? Your American robin is wonderful. They do like trees, but I’ve seen even more on the ground in search of worms and other bugs for their next meal.

How do robins hunt for worms? Worms must be hard to find, right? I read that robins mostly use their very good vision. They can spot the tiny end of a worm as it pokes out of the dirt. They can also see small changes in grass as worms move about just below the surface, which tells them that a worm is there. To be sure, they tilt their head to better see with one eye. Then they strike.

They also have very good hearing. As worms wiggle about, they move soil so that small bits of dirt rub together. This makes noise that is way too faint for us to hear, but it’s easy-peasy for robins. I’ll be excited to see them come back this Spring. Look out, worms!

Happy reading,

Jessica